Product Review: Hydro Flask vs. Takeya ThermoFlask

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We’ve all seen them, insulated stainless steel water bottles. They’ve become the newest water bottle craze and are popping up everywhere. They guarantee to keep hot beverages hot  and cold beverages cold for a particular length of time. That’s great and all, but what I really want to know is how hot is hot and how do they compare to each other.

Side by side comparison of the Hydro flask vs the thermoflask

Two of the big sellers are the Hydro Flask and the Takeya Thermoflask.

Both of these bottles are BPA free, insulated 18/8 stainless steel. The Hydro Flask weighs 17 oz and the Thermoflask weighs 12.8 oz. They both come in a variety of colors and sizes. The Hydro Flask guarantees 24 hours cold, 6 hot and the Thermoflask guarantees 24 hours cold and 12 hours hot.

I’ve been the owner of three Hydro Flasks (40 oz, 32 oz, and 18 oz) for almost a year now. As someone who can only drink warm/hot liquids (yay, cold urticaria), these water bottles have been a life saver for me. They’ve allowed me to heat up my water in the morning at camp and then carry the bottles with me all day. That’s a huge deal for an adventure junky with a cold allergy.

Then last week, I came across the Takeya ThermoFlask at Costco, which promised the same 12 hour hot, 24 hour cold guarantee as the Hydro Flask. They came in a two pack, with two 40 oz bottles for just $34.00, that’s roughly the same price as one Hydro Flask, and they’re also 4.2 oz lighter, which is nice for when you’re carrying 2-3 of them in your pack.

So I picked them up and decided to do a little experiment to see how they compare to the Hydro Flask.

Hydro flask vs thermoflask featured imageExperiment #1: How do these two compare with long term storage of a hot beverage?

Method: I filled each bottle with 40 oz of almost boiling water. I checked the starting temperature, the temperature after 6 hrs, 12 hrs and 24 hrs (I was sleeping at 18 hours). No liquid was removed during this test.

This mimics filling a thermos with hot cocoa in the morning to drink later, or with soup to have with your dinner.

Hydro Flask ThermoFlask
8:00 am 200 degrees 200 degrees
2:00 pm 180 degrees 180 degrees
8:00 pm 160 degrees 160 degrees
8:00 am 120 degrees 110 degrees

Summary: These two insulated water bottles were neck and neck until the 24 hour mark. At that point, the Hydro Flask was just ten degrees warmer. Still warm enough for me to drink, but still disappointing if you were expecting hot cocoa and got luke warm cocoa instead. That said, they only guarantee to keep hot things hot for 12 hours. At 12 hours they were both at 160 degrees. Deliciously hot. 

Experiment #2: How do these two insulated water bottles compare with regular use?

Method: I filled each bottle with 40 oz of almost boiling water. I checked the starting temperature and then removed 4 oz every hours for 8 hours. Each time I removed 4 oz, I also checked the temperature.

This mimics regular use of the water bottle, filling it up and then slowly drinking it through out the day.

Hydro Flask Thermoflask
8:00 am (start) 190 degrees 190 degrees
9:00 am (one hour) 180 degrees 180 degrees
10:00 (two hours) 170 degrees 170 degrees
11:00 am (three hours) 165 degrees 165 degrees
12:00 pm (four hours) 160 degrees 160 degrees
1:00 pm (five hours) 155 degrees 155 degrees
2:00 pm (six hours) 145 degrees 140 degrees
3:00 pm (seven hours) 135 degrees 130 degrees
4:00 pm (eight hours) 130 degrees 120 degrees

Results: Both of these bottles successfully kept the water hot for six hours, even with the bottles being opened every hour and cooler air being allowed to enter them. However beyond that, the Hydro Flask definitely our performed the Thermoflask. 

Overall Thoughts: Based on this, I would recommend the Thermoflask for people like me who are drinking from the bottle as their only water source.  Even with a 40 oz bottle, they’re unlikely to be using the bottle longer than 6 hours.  While the Hydro Flask is an awesome water bottle, the Thermoflask is lighter, cheaper and performs almost as well as the Hydro Flask, in both situations tested. If you’re wanting something to keep your coffee or hot cocoa hot while you’re out skiing or ice climbing all day, and it’s not your main source of hydration, then I’d recommend the Hydro Flask, as it performs better under those circumstances. 

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26 Comments

  • Thanks for the great review. I just bought a set at Costco and was hoping they would compare to the Hyrdoflask. Seems as if they are close enough, I can pass these along to my girls and pick up 2 hyrdoflask for the hubby & I.

    • rayna

      Honestly, I’m not sure. The Hydroflasks come in a ton of different shapes and sizes, so I can’t say that none of them will, but the ones I have would not share lids.

    • Ron

      Yes you can. I prefer using all my Takeya caps with my hydroflask. In fact, my friend prefers it too and ordered just the cap on Amazon to use with his hydroflask.

  • Lorrie Freilich

    You are amazing. That is exactly the kind of test that tells all. Thank you for sharing your findings. TAKEYA should pay you. I find Costco does tend to pick things with high quality. Again….Thanks.

  • Angeline

    Thank you so much for your review…that was an excellent way of showing the difference in temperatures at different times. I’ve been debating on which ones to get & since the ones from Costco you get 2 for the price of 1 hydroflask has made a difference to which we should get. There are so many out there that say they do the same, but with your awesome review, I know which I’ll buy 🙂

  • Rita

    I understand you can’t drink cold…and you did awesome explaining the Hot…so do you think they will perform just as good for Cold?

    • rayna

      Hi Rita,

      I would imagine they’d do just as well, if not better in the cold, since they guarantee a longer cold time than hot. If you decide to try it, I’d love to know how it does!

    • HB

      They perform extremely well for cold. I live in Phoenix, and even when I leave these bottles in the car in over 100 degree heat, the water inside is ice cold. We find ice floating around after 24 hours.

  • HB

    I did not purchase the 40 oz Thermoflask from Costo because they were frankly too big to carry around, especially for my littles who take these bottles to school, and I knew a lot of other people would be carrying around bottles identical to mine. However, I did purchase 4 smaller sizes and preferred colors from Amazon (there is a 20% off coupon, which I used for each bottle). I’m more concerned about cold water because we live in the desert. Thermoflask bottles kept the water ice cold for almost 24 hours, and at 24 hour mark, I usually find a piece of ice or two still floating around. We love them! My biggest complaint about Hydroflask, and why I did not purchase them, is because they have a screw top with no drinking spout or straw. My kids would not be able to use those without making messes. Thermoflask lid is wide for filling, but then there is a drinking spout that does not leak when closed properly.

  • Fernando Gil

    Hi Rayna, my friend Sean and I just read this post for determining what water bottle Sean should get. We really appreciate it this was wonderful. You are wonderful Rayna, thank you for not only your contributions to us but to the world at large. We’ve decided Sean is going with the Takeya. Peace.

  • Yukio kudo

    Thank you for your review. I’ve been a Hydroflask snob years. I have a few sizes and when people try them they love them. However, they are pricey and most of the people, at least my family are only going to fill it with coffee to take to a soccer game. So now I have a less expensive option to give as gifts.

  • Jimbo

    Did you open the whole lid or just the small spout when emptying the 4 ounces from the Takeya? It seems not having to open the large lid would allow the Takeya to retain more heat.

  • How do you use the Thermoflask to sip instead of chugging or pouring? Do they sell a long straw Online? Or is there something I just don’t know? A lot of times I just want to sip my drinks while I’m on the treadmill. Thank you! ☺

  • Denny

    Thank you for the detailed review. Hydroflask seemed to be all the popping up everywhere. I know two people who have the thermaflask and love them. I wanted to see what is the real difference. Plus, Hydroflask can be expensive depending on what size. I love that Costco offers two containers for the one and that the Thermoflask is lightweight!

    • S. Brady

      I have a Tekeya, and put ice water in, and after an 8 hour nights sleep, it still had ice. I think the trick is to get the inside really cold first, then put in your liquid and ice.

    • KP

      I have the Takeya from Costco and love them. I just purchased them this year for hiking and they are light weight and keep ice for over 24 hours. I was skeptical but for cold beverages, they definitely keep them cold. I have not yet tried it for hot as it’s summer time so will wait and see what happens come winter!

    • rayna

      Hi Rusty! I haven’t experienced any problems with the Takeya Lid. The only problem I’ve had with lids in general is that the Hydro Flask’s first generation lid gets jammed up all the time. I have three of them and they all have the same problem. They cross thread very easily and then once heat builds up inside (For hot beverages) they’re very hard to get open without spilling hot liquids all over you. This seems to be a wear and tear issue and something I haven’t experienced with the newer lids.

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